WITHIN THE VINES©
The Herr Family; First Generation: Bishop Hans Herr
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1 Hans  (Bishop) HERR1,2

Birth: 17 Sep 1639, Switzerland1,2
Death: 10 Jan 1725/9 June 1730, At Lancaster Co., PA3,4
Burial: 14 Oct 1725,  Red Brick Church Mennonite Cemetery, Lancaster, PA5
Father: Kristen**(Formerly Thought Hans) HERR (1610-)
Mother: Link to Kristin as possibly same as Hans HERR

Hans Herrs Ascendancy and his wife are at odds in the sources. See the parent entry here given for him and read the narrative to support the choice as present in this tree. As to his wife, Jay D Weaver, in his beautifully sourced website writes Hans Herr was born on 17 Sep
Spouse: Barbel**(Formerly Thought Elizabeth Kendig) KUNDIG2,1
Birth: 1644/about 1643, Switzerland12,13
Death: (9 June) 17301
Father: Jorg** [Peter] KUNDIG (<1598->1650)
Mother: Barbel** [Barbara Huffenberg] HUFFELLBERG (->1650)
Marr: abt 167014

Children:
Abraham** (~1672-<1725)
 Maria ¥¥ [Now suspected NOT a dtr] (~1673-)
 John (Hans) (1672-1756)
 Christian (Rev.) [to Swope Marriage] (1683-1749)
 Emmanuel (1689-1740)
 Isaac (1690-<1747)
1639 in Switzerland. (590) He died on 10 Jan 1725.(39) I have chosen to use the material from Jane Best's article in Jan., 1992 issue of PMH rather than the traditional view as put forth in Herr and Eshleman's  genealogy of Martin Kendig.
 Perhaps the identity of Hans Herr wife deserves some more research.
 Parents: Kristen Her and /Unknown/ /Unknown/.
 He was married to Barbel Kundig about 1670.(591) Children were: Abraham Herr, Christian Herr, John Herr,Emanuel Herr, Isaac Herr.6

See History of Hans Herr and the Hans Herr collection from Millersville http://www.millersville.edu/~archives/archweb/manuscripts/manus059.htm
 

Hans Herr may have been among the eight families who were helped by the Friends in London in April 1709 through a contribution of 50 from their Yearly Meeting. 5 Hans Herr was  one of the colony of Mennonite emigrants who came to this country in 1709, was previously a bishop of the church, and continued in the office after his settlement here.7I n 1709, he and other Palatinates purchased 10,000 acres of land on the south side of Pequea Creek in Lancaster PA.  He was not only the soul of energy in an agricultural point of view, but erected the first Mennonite Church, a structure built of sandstone, the ruins of which can still be seen on the farm now owned by David Hoover, residing near Willow Street. The rude hand of time has sadly changed the finish of the building since Hans Herr and his little flock of followers crossed its threshold.8 In 1719 Hans Herr is said to have constructed the famous stone house in Willow Street that bears his name....for more than 100 years a Mennonite Meeting House. 5 A virtual tour of the Hans Herr home is available at: http://www.lgms.pvt.k12.pa.us/HansHerr/vtour/vtourwelcome.html  The site states:  Built in 1719, this is purportedly the oldest building in Lancaster County and the oldest documented Mennonite meetinghouse in America. It  has been depicted in several paintings by Andrew Wyeth ... a descendant of Hans Herr.   Bishop Hans Herr served (as Bishop)  many years, and was succeeded by his grandson, John Herr, who also served in that office for many years.7He is described as "of medium height, with long grey hair curled under at the ends and parted in the middle,....Heavy brows, dark hazel eyes, aquiline nose, mouth rather small with heavy lips,complexion florid,with full beard covering the face, the whole lighted by a countenance in which sweetness and austerity were gracefully blended. Clad in the coarsest homespun, his feet shod with wood, he at last arrived in the far-off land in which some strange prophecy told him he and his People would be prosperous and happy, however poor when arriving. ( C.H. Martin, paper read before the Lancaster county historical society, 1925)9 While in Switzerland, Hans Herr became a member of the Mennonites and a prominent minister. He emigrated to Palatinate, Germany.... (and) arrived in the New World on 16 Sept. 1710 on the ship: Maria Hope.10 The first authentic account we have of the Lancaster County settlement is that Hans Meylin, his son, Martin, and Hans Herr, John Rudolph Bundly, Martin Kendig, Jacob Miller, Martin Oberholtzer, Hans Funk, Michael Oberholtzer, Wendell Bowman, and others, with their families, came as far as the Conestoga in 1709, and there selected a tract of ten thousand acres to the north of Pequea Creek . The warrant for this was recorded, and the land surveyed to them Oct. 23, 1710. A very quaint account of them says  the sect came from a German Palatinate, at the invitation of William Penn. "The men wore long red caps on their heads. The women had neither bonnets, hats, nor caps, but merely a string passing around the head to keep the hair from the face. The dress both of female and male was domestic, quite plain, made of coarse material, after an old fashion of their own. Soon after their arrival at Philadelphia they took a westerly course, in pursuit of a location where they could all live in one vicinity. They selected a rich limestone country, beautifully adorned with sugar-maple, hickory, and black and white walnut, on the border of a delightful stream abounding in the finest trout. Here they raised their humble cabins. The water of the Pequea was clear, cold, transparent, and the grape-vines and clematis inter-twining among the lofty branches of the majestic buttonwood formed a pleasant retreat from the noon-beams of a summer sun."11History of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, with Biographical Sketches of Many of its Pioneers and Prominent Men. originally published in Philadelphia by Everts and Peck in 1883. Chapter XXVI. The Mennonites. From Online Database Library [ancestry.com] Lancaster County, Pennsylvania History.

Rupp, who wrote in 1844, though commonplace and sometimes tiresome, alone, of all the earlier chroniclers of this people, has put us under obligations for the scanty details he has preserved in an historical form of the early colony. "On the 23d of October the land was surveyed and divided among the Meylins, Herr, Kendig, and others of the company. Having erected temporary shelters, some set about it and put up dwellings of more durableness. Martin Kendig erected one of hewed walnut logs on his tract, which withstood the storms and rain, the gnawings of the tooth of time, for more than one hundred and ten years, and might, had it not been removed in 1841, and its place taken up by one of more durable materials, have withstood the corroding elements for generations to come. They now began to build houses and add new acquisitions of lands to their first possessions. To depend upon their Indian neighbors for provisions was useless. The Indians depended mainly upon game and fish. Of course, the supplies of provisions were scanty, and what they had they were under the necessity to transport from a distant settlement for some time, till the seeds sown in a fertile soil yielded some thirty, others fortyfold. Fish and fowl were plenty in the wilds. The season of their arrival was favorable around them, they saw crowned the tall hazel with rich festoons of luscious grapes. After they had been scarce fairly seated they thought of their old homes, their country, and friends. They sighed for those whom they left for a season. They remembered them that were in bonds as bound with them, and which suffered adversity, and ere the earth began to yield a return in kindly fruits to their labors, consultations were held and measures devised to send some over to their Vaterland to bring the residue of some of their families--also their kindred and brothers in a land of trouble and oppression to their new home--into a land where peace reigned and abundance of the comforts of life could not fail. They had strong faith in the fruitfulness and natural advantages of their choice of lands; they knew these would prove to them and their children the home of plenty. Their anticipations have never failed.11
 

"The race of Herr descended from a very ancient family; is free--that is to say, of noble origin. . . . Likewise from time immemorial, its knights were brave and worthy. . . . Possessing in Schwaben vast and rich estates, the name of which was called and written Hern von Bilried. . . . The father of this race was called the Schwabish Knight Hugo, the Herr or Lord of Bilried. . . . In the year 1009 flourished and was known to all, the family from whom that of Herr is descended. . . . But in the fifteenth century several of the race resigned their nobility and settled as citizens . . . They, however, retained their noble name and their Coat of Arms, and in the year 1593 John Herr, or Lord of Bilried, obtained from the Emperor Ferdinand, in Schwabish Hall, a written testimonial, proving for his flourishing family their Coat of Arms, their free and noble descent and the possession of their race to the latest generation."
"And this Coat of Arms yet rightly belongs to the present living family of Herr."
E. B. VIEN.
Recorded in the Register of noble families, with their Coat of Arms. Book 5, page 258.
Found at Geneology.com
 
 

Following from http://www.horseshoe.cc/pennadutch/families/herr/herr.htm
1719 HANS HERR HAUS
Descriptive narrative provided by the tour center
In 1710 a group of 27 Mennonites, led by the elderly Hans Herr, left the Palatinate for the New World. Swiss in origin, they had left Zurich canton in the latter 1600s because of persecution. They moved to Palatinate because Karl Ludwig had invited them to help rebuild the area, devastated by the Thirty Years War. Even in the Palatinate they experienced restrictions: they could only worship in small groups in private homes, they could admit no one from other denominations to their meetings and were not to re-baptize people who had already been baptized, they were also restricted in land ownership and had to pay special taxes. But they endured these restrictions, as well as several attacks on the Palatinate by Louis XIV. Then in 1709 a severe winter was followed by a famine Finally the Mennonites decided it was time to move. The group led by Hans Herr left the Sinsheim area as an advance group. If they liked the colony of Pennsylvania they would send for their friends and relatives. Arriving in Philadelphia, the group decided they would purchase their on the western frontier of the colony. They followed an Indian trail into the forest and became the first white settlers of Lancaster County. Their first homes were built of the logs left when they cleared the forest for their fields. They sent for family members who stayed in Germany and by 1719 the settlement had groi4n to over 50 families. In that year Christian Herr built "the first stone house in the community. It reflected his Germanic background, having a stube, kuche, eck bank, kachelofen, and other features typical of homes in the Palatinate and Switzerland. Christian, his wife, seven children, his eighty-year old father Hans (after whom the museum is named), and his mother Elizabeth all lived in the house. Since both Christian and Hans were ministers, the house also served as, a place for worship services. Mennonite church in America. Today it is the oldest remaining The datestone over the door is original to the house and bears Christian's initials and the date. The s-shaped symbol over the I of 1719 was used to indicate Anno Domini or A.D. The Herr house has been restored and furnished to show the period of 1719 to 1750. The kuche has a very large fireplace which is located in the center of the house. The fireplace itself was not used for heat but provided access to the kachelofen, which warmed the stube. Unlike the English settlers, who used a large fire in the fireplace for heating and cooking, the German settlers used the oven for heating and used only small fires for cooking. a hearth raised around two feet above the floor level. The fires were built on this kind of hearth was much more convenient and safer than the English colonials' floor level hearths. The wooden fire crane in the fireplace is original and was used to hold pots over the fires. There is a local story that one night the Herrs had a hunting party of Indians take refuge in their kitchen in front of the fireplace. Lancaster County was settled peaceably and the Mennonites got along well with the local Conestoga Indians. The house has a root cellar, where they stored turnips, cabbages, apples, onions, smoked meats, and apple cider. Cider was the main drink of the early settlers. Apples were so important that many farms had as many as 150 apple trees. They did not eat potatoes in the early 18th century because they thought potatoes were poisonous The small room next to the kitchen was used for storage of food items and tools. Nearly every room of the house provided storage space, since the house was the only building on the farm. One Pennsylvania German farmer near here kept a horse collar and harness, a crosscut saw, and old lumber in his bedroom.

The stube is located behind the kitchen fireplace. Because of the kachelofen it was the warmest room in the house and the center of family Elderly members of the family sometimes slept in the stube; we think- this is where Hans and his wife Elizabeth slept. In this house the stube also acted as the place of worship. Here the members of the Mennonite community gathered every second or third Sunday. Today all Mennonite groups meet in church buildings but the Amish continue to meet in homes for worship. The minister did not preach from a pulpit but used a simple table. On the table are Christian Herr's family Bible, two Ausbunds, and a Martyrs' Mirror. The Martyrs' Mirror is a book containing many stories about the Anabaptist martyrs during the time of the Reformation. The predecessors of the Mennonites, the Anabaptists were the radicals of the Reformation. Among their most radical ideas were belief in adult baptism on a basis of a statement of faith (which resulted in the nickname "Anabaptist," which meant "re-baptizer. ), separation of church and state, and a commitment to nonviolence. The Mennonites are named after Menno Simons, one of the leaders of the Anabaptists. Literally thousands of Anabaptists were thrown in prison, tortured, and killed because of their radical beliefs. Martyrs' Mirror. Their stories are in the The Ausbund is a hymn book. The first Ausbund was printed in 1564 Keith songs which were sung by the Anabaptists while in prison. The Ausbund is still in print and is used by the Amish in their services. It is the oldest Protestant hymn book that has been in continuous use until today, Christian Herr's Bible was printed in 1738 in Basle. He must purchased it on one of his trips back to Philadelphia to sell flour. The journey to Philadelphia took around two days in good weather. When Christian died in 1750, the Bible was part of an inventory done of his possessions. At that time it was worth the same amount of money as two cows.

The strange object standing on the table near the books is a rush light. These used the stem of a bullrush or cattail which had been soaked in fat or grease. When lit they provided a flame free while Candles were quite expensive. Although smoky and smelly, they were

The kammer was the master bedroom for Christian and his wife Anna. They slept on a rope bed, with a straw mattress, and a feather bed on top for warmth. The Germans used feather beds and the English used wool blankets. In that room is a chest which was used by a German family that emigrated to Lancaster County in 1737. In order to identify their trunk once they got to Philadelphia, they put a label inside the lid with their four names and the date of 1737. The label has remained inside the lid for over 250 years immigration by a family of four, It proves the trunk was used for In the early years after arrival, the Mennonite settlers had very little furniture.

Often the chest they used for immigration was the largest item of furniture in their house. But they prospered and by 1750 many had schranks for their clothing. However the schrank itself was not so valuable as the clothing that was kept in it. 1750. This piece of furniture was made in Lancaster County around The plaster has been left off part of the ceiling in this room to show the insulation used: pieces of wood wrapped with rye straw. This was a tradition brought from Germany and does a good job of insulating the house. The rye straw was used because it was bitter to rats and mice and they would not chew on it.

The children slept in the first attic, which also served as a storage area. The second attic above it was just for storage. The steps used to go to the second attic are original and very unique, each is cut from a section of log.

The second attic was heated by an iron five-plate stove, fed by a small fireplace. Hot coals from the fire were put in the stove, which radiated heat into the attic. The children would have slept on beds similar to that of their parents, probably as many as three or four shared a bed. Despite the stove it still got quite cold in the attic during the winter because there was no insulation. Even though there appear to be gaps between the shingles, the roof is watertight sidelap as well as an overlap. The roof shingles are quite long and have a Some of the tools used to build houses like the 1719 Herr House are located in the attic. These include broadaxe, used for hewing logs into beams, and a froe, used to split shingles. After splitting a shingle it was shaved down using a schnitzelbank-, which held the shingles in place for working. Following your tour of the 1719 Herr House, you are welcome to browse around the museum grounds. Be sure to visit "Faith and Furrow, Mennonite rural life, in the long white barn by the millstones. A gift shop and restrooms are located in the white farmhouse which serves as our visitors center. Descriptive Narrative provided by the Tour Center of the Hans Herr House presented in the Comprehensive pages of Pioneers and Patriarchs,  Pennsylvania Dutch History, Genealogy and Culture, ~ Swiss Mennonite and German Palatine Immigrants~ http://www.horseshoe.cc/pennadutch/families/herr/herr.htm
 

For further research: Andrew Wyeth , (July 12, 1917 - Andrew Wyeth born to Newell Convers and Carolyn Bockius Wyeth at Chadds Ford, PA. Youngest of five children.), son of NC (Wyeth, N. C. (Newell Convers), 1882-1945.),, son of Hattie and  a descendant of Hans Herr. http://www.lgms.pvt.k12.pa.us/HansHerr/vtour/vtourwelcome.html

Theodore Herr, in his book Geneological record of Rev Hans Herr ...shows 7 children to this couple, all of those noted here in minus Isaac and with  (Maria is felt questionable) and also including a Samuel, last resided Letort,Pa.,b.1686 and Henry,last resided NewProvidence,Pa.,d.1785.
 

Herr Research Resources
* Genealogical Record of Rev. Hans Herr and His Lineal Descendants, Theodore W. Herr, Reprinted by the Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society, 2215 Millstream Road, Lancaster, PA 17602-1499 ISBN 1-884732-03-8
 
 
 

to America in 1710 along with his son and wife. They bought ten thousand acres with John Rudolph Bundeli, Jacob Mueller, Martin Kendig, Christian Herr (Hans Herr's son), Hans Graeff, Martin Oberholtzer, Hans Funck, Michael Oberholtzer, and Wendell Bauman. They bought the land at a price of twenty five cents an acre. Christian then built the first stone house of their area in 1719 on the five hundred thirty acres that he got. The house was also used as a meeting house because Christian was the Minister of the Willow Street Mennonites.
Hans Herr House Website

Spouse: Barbel**(Formerly Thought Elizabeth Kendig) KUNDIG2,1
Birth: 1644/about 1643, Switzerland12,13
Death: (9 June) 17301
Father: Jorg** [Peter] KUNDIG (<1598->1650)
Mother: Barbel** [Barbara Huffenberg] HUFFELLBERG (->1650)
Marr: abt 167014

Children: Abraham** (~1672-<1725)
 Maria ¥¥ [Now suspected NOT a dtr] (~1673-)
 John (Hans) (1672-1756)
 Christian (Rev.) [to Swope Marriage] (1683-1749)
 Emmanuel (1689-1740)
 Isaac (1690-<1747)

1.1a Abraham** HERR*15,16

Birth: about 1672/1660, Zurich, Switz  (Alsace According To 2nd Source)1,17,18
Death: bef 16 Dec 1725, Conestoga Twp, Chester Co, PA19,20
Burial: Red Brick Church Mennonite Cemetery, Lancaster, PA5

Resided Manor, Penna1He settled in Manor Twp., and warranted land in 1717. he Immigrated with his father, Hans Herr.
His marriages and children are in dissarray here, being an amalgam of sources. One source5 shows clearly he married Anna Bare, who had Samuel b. 1686, and that after he married Feronica Musselman, without other children mentioned. This information  is sourced, while the other sources with the remaining children do not site their sources.
He died before 16 Dec 1725 in Conestoga Twp, Chester Co, PA.(558)  Settled in Manor Twp., warranted land in 1717. Immigrated with his father, Hans Herrhttp://www.jdweaver.com/weavfam/d12.html#P1158
"ABRAHAM HERR (who came with his father HANS HERR in 1710), Bishop Hans Burkholder and Melchior Brenneman formed a settlement in 1717 along the Conestoga." (Taken from Mennonites of Lancaster Conference, by Martin G. Weaver, 1931, pp. 37-38.)
"On October 12, 1719, ABRAHAM HERR and his brother, Hans, petitioned James Steel for a grant of 400 acres for their brother, Isaac, who had recently arrived. In the 1720s, according to the estimates of architectural historians, he built a house that still stands at 25 Bentley Lane in Lancaster Township near Millersville on land that went to his son, Rudy." (Taken from the 1994 Supplement to the Third Edition of the Genealogical Record of Hans Herr, by Theodore W. Herr, originally published 1908, p. 788.) 21

Spouse: Anna** BAR22,17,23
Birth: 1680, Switzerland17
Death: 174917
Father: Heinrich** BAR (1640-)
Mother: Verena (?)** MAYER
Marr: 1699/824,25

Children: Abraham (1700-1785)
 Rudolph** (1701-<1775)
 Barbara (~1702-1742)
 John (1705-1796)
 Elizabeth (~1703-1735)
 Christian (Rev.) (1720-<1763)

Other spouses: Feronica (Frena) MOSIMAN/ MUSSELMAN

1.1b Abraham** HERR* (See above)

Spouse: Feronica (Frena) MOSIMAN/ MUSSELMAN17,26
Birth: 1660/1696, Zurich, Switzerland27,28
Death: 1764, Penna21
Father: Christian MOSIMAN / MUSSELMAN (-1734)
Mother: Mary
Marr: abt 172121

Children: Samuel (1722-<1787)
 David (1722-1771)

Other spouses: Anna** BAR

1.2 Maria ¥¥ [Now suspected NOT a dtr] HERR29

Birth: abt 1673, In Strasburg, Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania29

Marias position as Hans dtr is seriously questioned, as is her marriage; she is said to have been married to Rev. Benedict Brackbill in 1701, but now considered undocumented (qv), as is her membership in the family.5 She was previously considered among Hans Herrs secure children which at one time were counted as eight, but are now considered 5, with Maria in question as number 6 (theodore Hess had included her in his 1908 tome)30
The children previously ascribed to her have been placed with the more current Verena married Brackbill as a result.

Spouse: Benedict (Rev.) (Benedikt ) BRACKBILL / BRECHBU(E)HL29,31
Birth: 1666, 1665 In Trachselwald, Switzerland31,32
Death: 27 Apr 172029,31,21
Father: Unknown BRACKBILL (BRECHBUEHL)
Marr: 170133

1.3 John (Hans) HERR34,35

Birth: 1672 or 1677(see memo)/1685, Theodore Herr Gives 1685 Birthdate30
Death: 12 Sep 1756/1765, Theodore Herr Gives 1765 Deathdate5,15
Alias: Theodore Herr ID #430

Mentioned by Bill Neff by name only. Birth and death date from alternate source (noted)
Died Before 6 Nov 1756 In Lampeter Twp, Lanc Co, PA....land agent; on June 24, 1710 signed London letter; warranted 530 acres in  Strasburg Twp. on Oct. 10, 1710; patented this June 30, 1711.      http://www.jdweaver.com/weavfam/d12.html#P608

John/Hans, may have come first as land agent in 1710, and the father may in fact be the John/Hans Herr, "the preacher", who died about 1737 and immigrated in 1717. He was (or could be) the father of the others. ["Corrections and Supplemental Data: families of the Herr Brothers and their children to No. 38", Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society, 1994 (Dr. Philip E Bedient)] 5

Spouse: Frances BRACKBILL34,36

Children: Veronica Fanny (1709-1780)
 Christian[under research as son and husband] (1717-<1772)
 Elizabeth

1.4 Christian (Rev.) [to Swope Marriage] HERR9,15

Birth: 16835
Death: 1749, Lancaster Co., Pa5

As early as 1709, large numbers of Mennonites from Germany had moved to Holland where they received aid from their wealthy Dutch counterparts. Most of the early emigrants sailed from the ports of Amsterdam and Rotterdam then on to an area near London, England, where they remained until their number was sufficient to fill a boat. An interesting letter dated June 27, 1710, in London from emigrants under such a circumstance was signed by Martin Kendig, Jacob Muller, Martin Oberholtzer, Martin Maile (Mylin), Christian Herr and Hans Herr24. These men had gone to America upon the encouragement of William Penn his agents. (See illustration No. 12)
Their ship the Maria Hope, arrived on September 23, 1710, in the port city of Philadelphia37
 

The family in Lancaster County is descended from Hans Herr, the pastor and spiritual adviser of a large colony of emigrants who made their way to Lancaster County from Switzerland in 1710. Hans Herr came here with his four sons, Abraham, Emanuel, John, and Isaac. One son, Christian, a minister of the Mennonite Church, had come in 1709.38In the year 1719, Christian Herr...built a substantial sandstone dwelling house (which is still standing) near the big spring in West Lampeter township, and in this house the church held regular worship.  Among the first ministers in the county before 1725....Christian Herr7  Rev. Christian was of Willow Street PA 5

Mennonite minister; signed London letter June 27, 1710; warranted 530 acres in  Strasburg Twp. Oct. 10, 1710; built 1719 house(first in Lancaster County.  Still standing. Recently restored.);Signed Dortrecht Confession in 172526

Builder of the 1719 Herr House.
Bishop Christian Herr had a large family Bible which has been preserved at the Herr House in Lancaster Co., PA. Evidently, after the death of her father in 1749, Elizabeth inherited the Bible and fortunately entered the births of all the children she and Michael Groff had.
http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bonnie&id=I2293

Spouse: Anna {Anna Miller -Under research] MILLER39,40

Children: John (-1773)
 Christian (-1763)
 Abraham (-1756)
 Elizabeth [to Swope marriage]
 Anna
 Maria Catharina {assumed wife}(1714-1783)
 Susanna
 Barbara (1769-1854)

1.5 Emmanuel HERR38,31,26

Birth: 168931,41
Death: 1740, Wheatland Mills42,43

The family in Lancaster County is descended from Hans Herr, the pastor and spiritual adviser of a large colony of emigrants who made their way to Lancaster County from Switzerland in 1710. Hans Herr came here with his four sons, Abraham, Emanuel, John, and Isaac. One son, Christian, a minister of the Mennonite Church, had come in 1709.38Rev. John Herr, a son of Emanuel Herr, who was one of the five sons of Hans Herr, who came here in 1710. In building it he obeyed the scriptural injunction, and founded his house upon a rock.44

Spouse: Maudlin BRACKBILL31
Birth: 170231
Father: Benedict (Rev.) (Benedikt ) BRACKBILL / BRECHBU(E)HL (1666-1720)
Mother: Verena MEISTER (ca1675-)
Marr: 172031

Children: John (Rev.) (1720-1797)
 Emanuel (1722-)

1.6 Isaac HERR

Birth: 16905
Death: bef 4 Oct 174745

The family in Lancaster County is descended from Hans Herr, the pastor and spiritual adviser of a large colony of emigrants who made their way to Lancaster County from Switzerland in 1710. Hans Herr came here with his four sons, Abraham, Emanuel, John, and Isaac. One son, Christian, a minister of the Mennonite Church, had come in 1709.38
settled in Martic Twp, now Providence Twp., with a son Henry (1691 (sic)  - 1785) * of New Providence PA5

Warranted land 171926

Children: Henry (-1777)
 
 

Sources

1. Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society, Lancaster, PA 1994, Theodore W. Herr, http://www.gendex.com/users/metzler/index.html, Call Number 1-884732-03-8, Jim Metzler Web Site, Burr and Metzler Family Genealogyg, JimMetzler@erols.com (Jim Metzler, Lutherville, Maryland).
2. Best, Jane Evans, Martin Kendig's Swiss Relatives, Pennsylvania Mennonite Heritage, January, 1992, Cited by : jay@jdweaver.com (http://www.jdweaver.com).
3. Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society, Lancaster, PA 1994, Theodore W. Herr, http://www.gendex.com/users/metzler/index.html, Call Number 1-884732-03-8, Jim Metzler Web Site, Burr and Metzler Family Genealogyg, JimMetzler@erols.com (Jim Metzler, Lutherville, Maryland), 10 june 1725 date.
4. Michael A. Smoke/Msmoke@msn.com   1-206-362-0504, Michael A.Smoke's FTM Home Page, http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/s/m/o/Michael-A-Smoke/index.html, viewed 042701, 1-206-362-0504, 1-425-486-6056, 13520 Linden Avenue N Apt. # 534  Seattle, WA 98133, Inconsistent but sometimes well sourced. Very well researched., 9 June 1730 date/ yet gives 14 oct 1725 burial.
5. Ibid.
6. Jay D Weaver, BEAUTIFULLY SOURCED SITE, Data Base of J D Weaver Geneology, http://www.jdweaver.com/weavfam/index.html, Viewed 050401, jay@jdweaver.com,  44 Black Oak Drive  Lancaster, PA 17602-3463, http://www.jdweaver.com/weavfam/d12.html#P608.
7. History of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, with Biographical Sketches of Many of its Pioneers and Prominent Men, originally published in Philadelphia by Everts and Peck in 1883, Ancestry.com Lancaster County, Pennsylvania History. [database online] Provo, UT, Chapter XXVII. Churches of the Mennonites, Dunkers, Reformed Mennonites, River Brethren, and Amish.
8. Ibid. Chapter LX. West Lampeter Township.
9. Ibid.
10. Michael A. Smoke/Msmoke@msn.com   1-206-362-0504, Michael A.Smoke's FTM Home Page, http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/s/m/o/Michael-A-Smoke/index.html, viewed 042701, 1-206-362-0504, 1-425-486-6056, 13520 Linden Avenue N Apt. # 534  Seattle, WA 98133, Inconsistent but sometimes well sourced. Very well researched., Sites:info. was researched by H.K. Eilers using materials in the collection of the Lancaster Mennonite Conference Society.
11. History of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, with Biographical Sketches of Many of its Pioneers and Prominent Men, originally published in Philadelphia by Everts and Peck in 1883, Ancestry.com Lancaster County, Pennsylvania History. [database online] Provo, UT, Chapter XXVI. The Mennonites.
12. Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society, Lancaster, PA 1994, Theodore W. Herr, http://www.gendex.com/users/metzler/index.html, Call Number 1-884732-03-8, Jim Metzler Web Site, Burr and Metzler Family Genealogyg, JimMetzler@erols.com (Jim Metzler, Lutherville, Maryland), gives 1644 and Switz.
13. Jay D Weaver, BEAUTIFULLY SOURCED SITE, Data Base of J D Weaver Geneology, http://www.jdweaver.com/weavfam/index.html, Viewed 050401, jay@jdweaver.com,  44 Black Oak Drive  Lancaster, PA 17602-3463, gives about 1643 date/Best, Jane Evans. Martin Kendig's Swiss Relatives. Pennsylvania Mennonite Heritage. January, 1992. p 9.
14. Ibid. cites: Best, Jane Evans. Martin Kendig's Swiss Relatives. Pennsylvania Mennonite Heritage . January, 1992. p.9.
15. Theodore W. Herr, Genealogical Record of Reverend Hans Herr and His Direct Lineal Descendants, Lancaster, PA: The Examiner Printing House. 1908., Viewed through Library at Genforum, http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/_glc_/5107/?Welcome=993216436, p 1.
16. Albert H. Gerberich, Brenneman History, The, Copyright 1938, reprinted 1988 By Selby Publ., Selby Publishing and Printin 3405 Zartman Rd, Kokomo, Indiana 46902, cited by source Barbara Christie <barbgeni@ix.netcom.com> Via Rootsweb World Connect Tree Entry, URL for Web pages below:, http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=SHOW&db=barbgeni&surname=Alexander%2C+James+Herbert, 090900.
17. Colleen Ryan Beener, Family Links - Ryan and Beener, http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=cbeener&id=I06812, <cbeener1@cs.com>.
18. Jay D Weaver, BEAUTIFULLY SOURCED SITE, Data Base of J D Weaver Geneology, http://www.jdweaver.com/weavfam/index.html, Viewed 050401, jay@jdweaver.com,  44 Black Oak Drive  Lancaster, PA 17602-3463, about 1672 date.
19. Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society, Lancaster, PA 1994, Theodore W. Herr, http://www.gendex.com/users/metzler/index.html, Call Number 1-884732-03-8, Jim Metzler Web Site, Burr and Metzler Family Genealogyg, JimMetzler@erols.com (Jim Metzler, Lutherville, Maryland), gives 1725 Pennna.
20. Jay D Weaver, BEAUTIFULLY SOURCED SITE, Data Base of J D Weaver Geneology, http://www.jdweaver.com/weavfam/index.html, Viewed 050401, jay@jdweaver.com,  44 Black Oak Drive  Lancaster, PA 17602-3463, gives before dec date and place. Cites:Best, Jane Evans. Bear Saga Update: Part One. Pennsylvania Mennonite Heritage, Vol 21 No 3; July, 1998, Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society, 2215 Millstream Rd, Lancaster, PA 17602. p 15.
21. John Charles Kraybill  Staten Island, NY 10301, Ancestors of Hettie Helen Mumma (main page Charlie Kraybill's Family Tree), http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/k/r/a/John-C-Kraybill/index.html, charliek.geo@yahoo.com.
22. Theodore W. Herr, Genealogical Record of Reverend Hans Herr and His Direct Lineal Descendants, Lancaster, PA: The Examiner Printing House. 1908., Viewed through Library at Genforum, http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/_glc_/5107/?Welcome=993216436, p 1/last name unknown in this source-anna.
23. Jay D Weaver, BEAUTIFULLY SOURCED SITE, Data Base of J D Weaver Geneology, http://www.jdweaver.com/weavfam/index.html, Viewed 050401, jay@jdweaver.com,  44 Black Oak Drive  Lancaster, PA 17602-3463, cites:Best, Jane Evans. Bear Saga Update: Part One. Pennsylvania Mennonite Heritage, Vol 21 No 3; July, 1998, Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society, 2215 Millstream Rd, Lancaster, PA 17602. p. 25, note 33.
24. Theodore W. Herr, Genealogical Record of Reverend Hans Herr and His Direct Lineal Descendants, Lancaster, PA: The Examiner Printing House. 1908., Viewed through Library at Genforum, http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/_glc_/5107/?Welcome=993216436, p 1; 1699 date.
25. Jay D Weaver, BEAUTIFULLY SOURCED SITE, Data Base of J D Weaver Geneology, http://www.jdweaver.com/weavfam/index.html, Viewed 050401, jay@jdweaver.com,  44 Black Oak Drive  Lancaster, PA 17602-3463, cites :Best, Jane Evans. Bear Saga Update: Part One. Pennsylvania Mennonite Heritage, Vol 21 No 3; July, 1998, Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society, 2215 Millstream Rd, Lancaster, PA 17602. p 15.
26. Ibid.
27. Colleen Ryan Beener, Family Links - Ryan and Beener, http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=cbeener&id=I06812, <cbeener1@cs.com>, 1660.
28. John Charles Kraybill  Staten Island, NY 10301, Ancestors of Hettie Helen Mumma (main page Charlie Kraybill's Family Tree), http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/k/r/a/John-C-Kraybill/index.html, charliek.geo@yahoo.com, 1696.
29. Descendants of Hans Herr, viewed 042601, Matt Burnett /johnburn@im3.com.
30. Theodore W. Herr, Genealogical Record of Reverend Hans Herr and His Direct Lineal Descendants, Lancaster, PA: The Examiner Printing House. 1908., Viewed through Library at Genforum, http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/_glc_/5107/?Welcome=993216436.
31. Michael A. Smoke/Msmoke@msn.com   1-206-362-0504, Michael A.Smoke's FTM Home Page, http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/s/m/o/Michael-A-Smoke/index.html, viewed 042701, 1-206-362-0504, 1-425-486-6056, 13520 Linden Avenue N Apt. # 534  Seattle, WA 98133, Inconsistent but sometimes well sourced. Very well researched., Sites: SOURCE: "Genealogical Record of Reverend Hans Herr" by Theodore W. Herr, Lancaster, PA, 1908 Page 1.
32. John Charles Kraybill  Staten Island, NY 10301, Ancestors of Hettie Helen Mumma (main page Charlie Kraybill's Family Tree), http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/k/r/a/John-C-Kraybill/index.html, charliek.geo@yahoo.com, 1665 In Trachselwald, Switzerland.
33. Michael A. Smoke/Msmoke@msn.com   1-206-362-0504, Michael A.Smoke's FTM Home Page, http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/s/m/o/Michael-A-Smoke/index.html, viewed 042701, 1-206-362-0504, 1-425-486-6056, 13520 Linden Avenue N Apt. # 534  Seattle, WA 98133, Inconsistent but sometimes well sourced. Very well researched., This marriage appears in question.
34. William A. Neff, The John Neff Story: Utah Pioneer of 1847, http://www.ocii.com/~fisher/neff/Spring2000.htm, Republished :s first appeared in 1996-1997 in the Neff News, a newsletter published by the Neff Family Historical Society in Pennsylvania, Neff Times A Newsletter to all descendants of John Neff and Mary Barr  Spring 2000.
35. Theodore W. Herr, Genealogical Record of Reverend Hans Herr and His Direct Lineal Descendants, Lancaster, PA: The Examiner Printing House. 1908., Viewed through Library at Genforum, http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/_glc_/5107/?Welcome=993216436, p 2.
36. Ibid. p 2/ no surname, only Frances.
37. The Ebys of Switzerland ; Unsourced at tree level, but preambles; Well researched site, Prepared by Alice Neff, and with source citations, Linked from Neff Family History [Homepage]; http://www.ocii.com/~fisher/neff/history.htm, Neff Family History website by J. Robert (Bob) Fisher, http://www.ocii.com/~fisher/neff/aebi.htm.
38. History of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, with Biographical Sketches of Many of its Pioneers and Prominent Men, originally published in Philadelphia by Everts and Peck in 1883, Ancestry.com Lancaster County, Pennsylvania History. [database online] Provo, UT, Chapter XXII. History of Medicine and Medical Men in Lancaster County.
39. Theodore W. Herr, Genealogical Record of Reverend Hans Herr and His Direct Lineal Descendants, Lancaster, PA: The Examiner Printing House. 1908., Viewed through Library at Genforum, http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/_glc_/5107/?Welcome=993216436, p 1  Anna Surname not given.
40. Michael A. Smoke/Msmoke@msn.com   1-206-362-0504, Michael A.Smoke's FTM Home Page, http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/s/m/o/Michael-A-Smoke/index.html, viewed 042701, 1-206-362-0504, 1-425-486-6056, 13520 Linden Avenue N Apt. # 534  Seattle, WA 98133, Inconsistent but sometimes well sourced. Very well researched., Anna Miller.
41. Jay D Weaver, BEAUTIFULLY SOURCED SITE, Data Base of J D Weaver Geneology, http://www.jdweaver.com/weavfam/index.html, Viewed 050401, jay@jdweaver.com,  44 Black Oak Drive  Lancaster, PA 17602-3463, Cites: Best, Jane Evans. Martin Kendig's Swiss Relatives. Pennsylvania Mennonite Heritage January, 1992. 15.
42. Michael A. Smoke/Msmoke@msn.com   1-206-362-0504, Michael A.Smoke's FTM Home Page, http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/s/m/o/Michael-A-Smoke/index.html, viewed 042701, 1-206-362-0504, 1-425-486-6056, 13520 Linden Avenue N Apt. # 534  Seattle, WA 98133, Inconsistent but sometimes well sourced. Very well researched., Date only Sites: SOURCE: "Genealogical Record of Reverend Hans Herr" by Theodore W. Herr, Lancaster, PA, 1908 Page 1.
43. Jay D Weaver, BEAUTIFULLY SOURCED SITE, Data Base of J D Weaver Geneology, http://www.jdweaver.com/weavfam/index.html, Viewed 050401, jay@jdweaver.com,  44 Black Oak Drive  Lancaster, PA 17602-3463, Gives place and date  Cites: Washburn, Elizabeth F. Snively - Snavely - The Swiss Ancestors and American Descendants of Johann Jacob Schnebele(1659-1743);. Gateway Press, Inc.; Baltimore, MD, 1986. 578.
44. History of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, with Biographical Sketches of Many of its Pioneers and Prominent Men, originally published in Philadelphia by Everts and Peck in 1883, Ancestry.com Lancaster County, Pennsylvania History. [database online] Provo, UT, Chapter LXXVI. Strasburg Township.
45. Jay D Weaver, BEAUTIFULLY SOURCED SITE, Data Base of J D Weaver Geneology, http://www.jdweaver.com/weavfam/index.html, Viewed 050401, jay@jdweaver.com,  44 Black Oak Drive  Lancaster, PA 17602-3463, Cites: Best, Jane Evans. Martin Kendig's Swiss Relatives. Pennsylvania Mennonite Heritage January, 1992. 9.
 

Index

BAR
 Anna** spouse of 1.1a
BRACKBILL
 Frances spouse of 1.3
 Maudlin spouse of 1.5
BRACKBILL  BRECHBUEHL
 Benedict (Rev.) (Benedikt ) spouse of 1.2
HERR
 Abraham child of 1.1a
 Abraham child of 1.4
 Abraham** 1.1a
 Anna child of 1.4
 Barbara child of 1.1a
 Barbara child of 1.4
 Christian child of 1.4
 Christian (Rev.) child of 1.1a
 Christian (Rev.) [to Swope Marriage] 1.4
 Christian[under research as son and husband] child of 1.3
 David child of 1.1b
 Elizabeth child of 1.1a
 Elizabeth child of 1.3
 Elizabeth [to Swope marriage] child of 1.4
 Emanuel child of 1.5
 Emmanuel 1.5
 Hans** (Bishop) 1
 Henry child of 1.6
 Isaac 1.6
 John child of 1.1a
 John child of 1.4
 John (Hans) 1.3
 John (Rev.) child of 1.5
 Maria Catharina {assumed wife} child of 1.4
 Maria ¥¥ [Now suspected NOT a dtr] 1.2
 Rudolph** child of 1.1a
 Samuel child of 1.1b
 Susanna child of 1.4
 Veronica Fanny child of 1.3
KUNDIG
 Barbel**(Formerly Thought Elizabeth Kendig) spouse of 1
MILLER
 Anna {Anna Miller -Under research] spouse of 1.4
MOSIMAN MUSSELMAN
 Feronica (Frena) spouse of 1.1b
 
 

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