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York County, Pennsylvania:  It's History and our Surnames Within It
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Adams County was formed 1800 from York. 
York was formed 1749 from Lancaster. 
Lancaster was formed 1729  from Chester County. 
Chester was one of the three original shires, 
or counties, of Pa.,which 
also included Philadelphia and Bucks
In 1800, immediately after the separation of Adams County from York County, York County boasted a population of 25,643.

The Susqhehanna marks York's eastward North South Border. It's role in History of York, Adams and the west of Penna :

The Susquehanna marked the westward boundary of lands purchased by Penn from the natives until 1738 when "all the land west of the Susquehanna to the setting sun" was purchased by Penn's heirs at which time robust settlement west of the Susquehanna began. This date of purchase, though, does not denote the first year of white settlement in York County by settlers of Pennsylvania, neither does it address the Maryland proprietory's claim of land also claimed by the Penns but not yet settled by deed from the natives. Settlement of the region by Catholic Marylanders in absence of negotiation or purchase from the natives and with blessing of the Maryland proprietors occured at the same time squatters moved west of the Susquehanna from Pennsylvania without benefit of warrant from the Pennsylvania proprietors.  The first settlers of York County were a mix of Marylanders and Pennsylvanians, both without clear title to the land, and subsequently often without legal documentation of their precense and paving the way for the lawlessness and turmoil marking York [and Adams] southern boundaries. This turmoil was addressed with several surveys over many decades, and finally settled with the Mason Dixon Survey yielding the Mason Dixon line of 1868 and the seperation of Pennsylvania and Maryland as we now know it today. .
See map of current Penna counties and the Susquehanna's branches. , Digges Choice [Maryland grant]  and Blunstone Licenses {Pennsylvania's answer to pre 1738 settlement with purpose to document and benefit from same}.

George Washington's diaries describe his travels from Taneytown, Md  to York, describing Littlestown [then York County, now Adams] as well as Hanover, and York within York County. All three of these towns are  surname relevant and the  diary entries are worth their short read, and the full context, beyond the excerpt confined only to York, are viewable in link from the pertinent  excerpt here given.  John Adams also visited and wrote a short paragraph on York Town.  Robert Proud and a "Jovial Stranger" wrote about the Penna Germans. All of these short excerpts are viewable in Link.

York County Township Formation from time of its pertinence to Lancaster:

The Susquehanna marks the eastern 
North South  border of York County

 
 
This map of York county formation tells several things. Hellam became a township immediately on the acquisition by deed of lands west of the Susquehanna by the Penns showing settlement sufficient for , and in need of , regional government.  Those townships formed pre 1749 pertained to Lancaster before York was created from it and answered needs of an increasing settlement in need of regional and more convenient local government. By looking at the years of their formation, we can see what areas first could support such local government and later had increasing population in need of again, more convenient local government. The area of the southwest of York, although boasting the earliest of settlers, was not formed to townships until later than that settlement in part because of the dispute with Maryland over the boundary of Penna and Maryland itself.  On York's formation in 1749, the townships once pertaining to Lancaster found themselves in York County. 

"Some of the very earliest Europeans in the original York County... found homes in what are now south-western York and southeastern Adams counties. They settled in what people then called the Conewago settlement, named after the stream flowing northward through it. [see Susquehanna basin  map] Many of them lived within the limits of a Maryland grant of about 10,000 acres which was called Digges Choice and extended from near Hanover" [Heidelberg Twp] "southwest to near Littlestown" [in neighboring westward Adams County which was formed from York in 1800] . "Surely anyone engaged in a serious study of the pioneers in the Conewago settlement or in Digges Choice must include in that study residents on both sides of a county line which was drawn many years later, after most of them had passed from the scene." Adams County Bicentennial Tidbits

Lower Susquehanna River:  Image from US Geological Survey , Dept of the Interior
In describing the first settlers of York [and Adams ] County Pennsylvania, one often encounters reference to the Conewago [Conewago Settlement, Little Conewago, etc] and the reference is actually to the land along this generous creek upon which many of the first settlers of the region depended. The map at left shows the large area of the Conewago, part of the Suequehanna system, It encompasses today's York and Adams Counties. 

See map of the Susquehanna superimposed on the counties of contemporary Penna below. 
 


 
The Susquehanna River marked the boundary of western lying Pennsylvania  obtained by William Penn and by him respected. His sons and heirs showed less respect than their father but did plan for , negotiate and eventually obtain by  treaty and deed all the lands "west of the Susquehanna to the setting sun". {See the walking purchase} .Squatting settlers  moved into this region and settled it before it was actually bought from the Indians.  The Penns, wishing to document the settlers and settlement, and to benefit economically from the western and illegal expansion, established Blunstone licenses in anticipation of the deed they later gained from the natives. At about the same time, Lord Baltimore, proprietor of Maryland, who did not work as diligently to acquire deed from the Indians, bestowed 10,000 to Digges  in the 1720s. Digge's chose his land in Maryland's northern reaches, in territoy also contested by Pennsylvania and for which the Penns and their agent James Logan  were actively engaged in negotiation  with the natives.   The subsequent turmoil and lawlessness of lower Adams and southwestern York County is discussed in the pages devoted to Adams , and Digges Choice. 

Meanwhile, in 1729, John and James Hendricks had made the first authorized settlement in what is now York County, on Kruetz Creek. http://www.york-county.org/misc/history.htm
"The winding stream which drains our fertile and
          historic valley, is now known as Kreutz Creek,
          which seems to be a corruption of the word
          "KREUZ" meaning "cross" for the place where two
          streams came together to form a cross.  It is
          mentioned in legal documents at the time of the
          early settlement and for nearly half a century later,
          as Grist Creek and the valley as Grist Valley, after
          one of the first English settlers, John Grist who
          located near the head of the stream as early as
          1719.  Other information shows that the creek may
          have been named after George Kreis, an early
          settler on the creek.  One of the factors leading to
          the concentrated settlement of the Hallam
          Borough area was the water from the north branch
          of Kreutz Creek.  " http://www.hallamborough.com/history.html
Hallam borough was formed from Hellam Township.

Germans, originally lured from the Rhenish Palatinate
by William Penn's agents,soon followed Englishmen into the new frontier. Pamphlets and even playing cards extolled the opportunities to be found in Pennsylvania. The first Irish and Scotch
took over the land in the southeast, then known as "York Barrens." To the north, families, mostly Quakers moving on from Chester County settled Newberry Township and its surroundings
called the "Redlands".  http://www.york-county.org/misc/history.htm

"Late Information of Monocacy Settlement

                                It was a short distance southeast of Creagerstown. The river crossing was at Poe's fording, which has not been used for over a century. There are other and earlier references to this place. As early as 1729 Charles Carroll, the elder, located a tract of 10,000 acres of land on Pipe creek,Conawago and Cadorus creeks, lying in York and Adams County, Pa., all claimed by the Maryland authorities to be in this, province. In 1732 Mr. Carroll in company with Mr. Ross visited these lands to inform themselves how to finish a survey. He refers. in his complaint to a certain John Tradane,a Marylander, and a resident of Monochasie.....
The Conewaga settlement first mentioned was near Hanover. A Lutheran church was organized  May, 1743, by Rev. David Chandler of York, who in the same year, 1743, organized the Lutheran church at Monocacy, and served till his death the following year, when Rev. Lars Nyburg became  the pastor of both congregations. The site of the log meeting house at Conewago, where Mr. Schlatter preached in May, 1747, is now covered by Christ's German Reformed church, a short distance from Littlestown, at the time Mr. Schley (the ancestor of Commodore Winfield Scott Schley) was schoolmaster at Frederick and Monocacy to the Reforms. Mr. Otto Rudolph Crecelius  was acting in same capacity for the Lutheran at the same places....The first settlement in York County was on Kratz creek where Hanover now stands; before that Lancaster County. In 1729 people resided on tract of land, on west side of Susquehanna, within  the bounds of York County. These persons remained however but a short time on land, on which  they had squatted. They were known as Maryland squatters, and were removed the latter part Of 1728 by order of Deputy Governor of Council, at the request of the Indians.

 In 1722 warrants were issued for a survey of a manor to Lord Baltimore. John Diggs, a resident of  Prince George County, Md., obtained a warrant for 10,000 acres, known as Diggs' Chance, in the  neighborhood of the present Han- over. Maryland at this time claimed the land to the   Susquehanna."James A. Helman's ~ 1906  History of Emmitsburg, Md. Found at the Emmitsburg Area Historical Society Pages. Md.h
 
 


{york County history citing the York County Government}

RECORDS AVAILABLE THROUGH THE YORK COUNTY ARCHIVES
Our Surnames and York Co
History
York County, Pa Townships and
Current Townships map 
York County 1895 [detailed and negotiable map] 
Current Stats on York 
General current map Penna
The York Daily Recorder
history of york with links AND
The York Daily Record 1700-1749
which details the history of 
Lancaster County from which 
York County was formed and 
which names several of our 
direct line ancestors in its pages. 
{VERY IMPORTANT LINK]
Location of the 35 tsps in York Co:
Gives formation and first then
subsequent townships with map. 
GOOD RESOURCE
Tombstone Transcription Project
for York County
York in the Revolution
Map of municipalities of York County
York County, Pennsylvania Genealogy
USGENWEB. Many historical and
Genealogical links
York County Historical Links
from the pages of York Daily Recorder
The town of York predates the formation of the county created from York in which it is found. In 1741, Deputy Surveyor for Lancaster County Thomas Chookson surveyed a parcel of land at the intersection of the Monocacy Trail and the Codorus Creek.  " He surveyed 437 acres on the banks of the Codorus Creek. On Nov 23, 1741 applicants agreed to pay seven shillings a year for the use of lots measuring 230 feet long and 65 feet wide, and to erect   on it, 'a substantial dwelling of 16 feet square at least within the space of one year' " History of York several paragraphs down in page from Hizman Cousins,  Volume I, Issue 9, Sept 2000. 
 "His goal [was] to lay out a town in grid formation, similar to Philadelphia. The town was to become York, named for Yorkshire, England. By the end of the year, 23 lots had been assigned. One of the first buildings to be erected was the Golden Plough Tavern, which is still standing  over 260 years later. In the surrounding frontier, German, Scotch-Irish, and Quaker settlers had already found the land suitable enough to call "home." Eight years later, York County was born, created out of Lancaster County in August 1749. It was the fifth county  in Pennsylvania, and the first west of the Susquehanna River. In the town of York, 63 log houses and two churches were now standing. Virtual York ů History Channel

In 1755, Benjamin Franklin spent time in York hiring 150 wagons, 259 pack horses and buying flour for General Braddock's army. In 1758 four companies of militia from the County took part in the capture of Fort Duquesne (later renamed Pittsburgh). " YORK COUNTY HISTORY FROM THE PENNS TO THE PRESENT
 
 

žžIn 1731 there were 15,000  members of the Reformed Church in Pennsylvania from the Palatinate. Up to 1776, when the importations ceased, 39,000 German emigrants had arrived and settled mainly in Lancaster, York, Berks and Northampton counties. As early as 1790, when the population of this State did not exceed 435,000 there were already 145,000 Germans ......As late as October 25, 1777, John Adams, with no prepossession in their favor, while in Yorktown...attested as follows: This town is a small one, not larger than Plymouth. There are in it two German churches, the one a Lutheran, the other Calvinistical. The Congregations are pretty numerous, and their attendance upon public worship is decent. It is remarkable that the Germans, wherever they are found, are careful to maintain the public worship, which is more than can be said of the other denominations of Christians this way. There is one church here, erected by the joint contributions of Episcopalians and Presbyterians, but the minister who is a missionary is confined for Toryism, so that they have had for a long time no public  worship......
 Said Robert Proud, the early historian of Pennsylvania in regards to the Germans of Pennsylvania: 
 "They are more adapted than any other nationalities to agriculture and the improvement of the wilderness." This opinion was fully  justified by events, for the wilderness was not only heroically invaded, but subdued and improved; the home of the Indians soon  became dotted with the dwellings of the immigrants, the rude log house was followed by the substantial stone dwelling, and this again by the stately mansion of brick, until the dense forest has been converted into beautiful gardens, towns and cities, and literally made to blossom like the rose of the Scriptures. 
Let us hear what a jovial stranger thought and said of the Pennsylvania Germans who wrought this transformation: 
 "I have lately passed through the Dutchiest part of Pennsylvania, and have observed some new and instructive points I never thought of before. Apparently said Dutch are a sedate people. They are as religious as New Englanders were fifty years ago. They are as sharp as Yankees after money, more saving and more generous. They are more intelligent, independent and happy than they appear, and bashful before strangers, especially the ladies. These and other traits make them appear exclusive and clanuish, yet they are the most social and comical people in America. Among them (if one understands their glib dialect) one can hear more words, jokes and hearty laughs in a minute than ever the modern Greek or neu hoch Deutsch. I now have learned that the Pennsylvanians, who are well acquainted in English, cling to their dialect in small rapid talk and the firing of a multiplicity of jokes. They laugh oftener than do the Yankees, their women can deliver four words to a Yaukee woman's one in English, and more when excited. Therefore, Pennsylvania Dutch is a phonetic dialect. I patent this idea, and say to those who make fun of it that they can find more comical, witty characters--real Yankees--in Pennsylvania than in New England." Edward W. Spangler. The Annals of the Families of Caspar, Henry, Baltzer and George Spengler. York, Pennsylvania: The York Daily Publishing Co., 1896. [G F Library] 

"1837: York County 

                                            Husbands' ads against wives

                       Wives did not always stay with their husbands "until death us do part" in the late
                       18th and 19th centuries. When they do leave their husbands' "bed and board," it is
                       customary for the men to warn the public. They pay for county newspaper
                       advertisements warning against granting their wives credit on their accounts.
                       William Adams takes the matter farther, saying in an ad that readers "are hereby
                       discharged from harboring the said Agness at their peril." In 1837, a York
                       newspaper tells of The Wheeling (W.Va.) Times decision to cease running such ads
                       because in most cases the husband is out for revenge because of some "fancied
                       injury." The newspaper reasons that the spouse generally provides no bed for her
                       "and none but the ditch for himself." As to the board, it's often a piece of wood laid
                       upon the back and shoulders, an apparent reference to abuse or the hard life of toil
                       facing many women. The newspaper must be convinced that the ad would be
                       justified and "then only when the fee is paid at the time of insertion" York 1828-1844 from the york county record
 

York has the auspicious if short lived history of being considered the first capital of the United States. The Continental Cogress met at York's first courthouse  [201 West market Street]  Sept. 30, 1777- June 27, 1778 [Link to places where the continental cogress met in chronological order ]  . John Adams then wrote a detailed description of the town.   The Continental Congress had fled to York, Pennsylvania just before the British occupied Philadelphia. While in York, on November 15, 1777, the Continental Congress adopted the Articles of Confederation, which was the first governing charter of the United States.

York City:  3,000 British and Hessian troops had been held as
prisoners during the Revolutionary War
 

              In 1863, York became the largest town north of the Mason-Dixon Line to be occupied by the Confederate Army.

Purchased by William Penn in 1736, laid out in 1741, home to the Continental Congress of
   the United States in 1788-1789 and considered as the Capitol of the United States, York
 has a long and colorful history as a strategic location. As one of only eight places to serve
                                                 as the seat of the national government, while in York, Congress debated and signed the
                                                  Articles of Confederation, one of the most important documents in American history.
Traveling America York Entry
 
 
 
 

"

See too Within These Pages: 

Indian Incursions into York 1755 
John Adams writes of York the town in 1777 [a thorough description] 
The Germans of Pennsylvania
The Germans and Soctch Irish of Penna
York, the town
See History of Hellam Township [good history of York and Hellam] 
The Manors of Penna
 

Early York described by some persons we know.
George Washington Wrote of the county surronding and the town of York [from Taneytown he travelled]
 "'Saturday 2d. Set out a little after 4 Oclock and in1 abt. 6 Miles crossed the line wch. divides the States of Maryland & Pennsylvania-- the Trees on wch. are so grown up tht. I could not perceive the opening  though I kept a lookout for it. 9 Miles from Tawny town, Littles town is past, they are of similar appe. but the latter is more insignificant than the former. Seven Miles farther we came to Hanover (commonly called McAlisters town) a very pretty village with a number of good brick Houses & Mechanics  in it. At this place, in a good Inn, we breakfasted and in 18 Miles more reached York Town where we dined and lodged.

The Country from Tawny Town to York town  is exceedingly pleasant thickly inhabited and well improvd. The dwelling Houses, Barns & meadows being good. After dinner in company with Colo. Hartley & other Gentlemen I walked through the principal Streets of the Town and drank Tea at Col. Hartleys. The Ct. Ho. was illuminated.' "  GW's diary.

The collection from which this is taken further states;
Littlestown, Pa., was founded in 1765 by the German settler Peter Klein; Hanover, Pa., was founded about 1763 by Col. Richard McAllister (d. 1795), a Scotch-Irish innkeeper who served in the Continental Army during the War of Independence.

GW arrived at York about 2:00 P.M. and lodged at Baltzer Spangler's tavern on Market Street. He was greeted by the ringing of bells and a salute from the Independent Light Infantry Company commanded by Capt. George Hay. "In the evening," reported one citizen, "there was a general illumination, and in the court house in each pane was set a light" (JORDAN, 46--48). "

G W Diary  entry [see page for full provision describing more of his trip in our environs ] From The George Washington Papers at the Library of Congress, 1741-1799
John Adams Wrote of York town in Penna in 1777:
žAs late as October 25, 1777, John Adams, with no prepossession in their favor, while in Yorktown...attested as follows: This town is a small one, not larger than Plymouth. There are in it two German churches, the one a Lutheran, the other Calvinistical. The Congregations are pretty numerous, and their attendance upon public worship is decent. It is remarkable that the Germans, wherever they are found, are carefulm to maintain the public worship, which is more than can be said of the other denominations of Christians this way. There is one church here, erected by the joint contributions of Episcopalians and Presbyterians, but the minister who is a missionary is confined for Toryism, so that they have had for a long time no public  worship......" 2
 
 "Said Robert Proud, the early historian of Pennsylvania in regards to the Germans of Pennsylvania:
             "They are more adapted than any other nationalities to agriculture and the improvement of the wilderness." This opinion was fully
              justified by events, for the wilderness was not only heroically invaded, but subdued and improved; the home of the Indians soon
               became dotted with the dwellings of the immigrants, the rude log house was followed by the substantial stone dwelling, and this
               again by the stately mansion of brick, until the dense forest has been converted into beautiful gardens, towns and cities, and
              literally made to blossom like the rose of the Scriptures,"  2

"Let us hear what a jovial stranger thought and said of the Pennsylvania Germans who wrought this transformation:

            "I have lately passed through the Dutchiest part of Pennsylvania, and have observed some new and instructive points I never
             thought of before. Apparently said Dutch are a sedate people. They are as religious as New Englanders were fifty years ago.
             They are as sharp as Yankees after money, more saving and more generous. They are more intelligent, independent and happy
             than they appear, and bashful before strangers, especially the ladies. These and other traits make them appear exclusive and
             clanuish, yet they are the most social and comical people in America. Among them (if one understands their glib dialect) one can
             hear more words, jokes and hearty laughs in a minute than ever the modern Greek or neu hoch Deutsch. I now have learned that
             the Pennsylvanians, who are well acquainted in English, cling to their dialect in small rapid talk and the firing of a multiplicity of
             jokes. They laugh oftener than do the Yankees, their women can deliver four words to a Yaukee woman's one in English, and
             more when excited. Therefore, Pennsylvania Dutch is a phonetic dialect. I patent this idea, and say to those who make fun of it
             that they can find more comical, witty characters--real Yankees--in Pennsylvania than in New England." 2
 
 


 
 
 
 

Link to this among the other pages here given http://216.239.53.100/search?q=cache:1uN4lNECuRcC:freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~mobraum/HinzmanReunion/KelleaNewsletters/Vol1issue09.doc+manor+of+Springettsbury&hl=en&ie=UTF-8
it gives a goo York History.
"Meanwhile in 1729, John and James Hendricks had made the first authorized settlement in what is now York County, on Kruetz Creek. Germans, originally lured from the Rhenish Palatinate by William Penn’s agents, soon followed Englishmen into the new frontier. Pamphlets and even playing cards extolled the opportunities to be found in Pennsylvania.

      The town of York was laid in 1741, when Thomas Cookson surveyed 437 ¬* acres on the banks of the Codorus Creek. On November 23, 1741, applicants agreed to pay seven shillings a year for the use of lots measuring 230 feet long and 65 feet wide, and to erect on it, ¬ìa substantial dwelling of 16 feet square at least¬Öwithin the space of one year.¬î

      On August 17, 1749 the provincial Assembly separated York County from Lancaster County and officially partitioned the new county.

      The French and Indian Wars which were fought so bitterly in western Pennsylvania in the 1750s spread within a day¬ís march of York County, and refugees from Cumberland County fled to its settlements. In 1755, Benjamin Franklin spent time in York hiring 150 wagons, 259 pack horses and buying flour for General Braddock¬ís army. In 1758 four companies of militia from the county took part in the capture of Fort Duquesne (later renamed Pittsburgh).

      Hanover, second largest town in the county, was a thickly grown grove of hickory trees until 1763, when Richard M¬íAlister laid out a town in a ¬ìno-man¬ís land,¬î
claimed by Maryland as well as Pennsylvania, and accepting the jurisdiction of neither. The border between the two provinces had been hotly contested and
“Maryland Intruders” roamed as far as the Susquehanna. The rivalry became so bitter that the British government arranged a survey to settle it. The line laid down by
engineers Mason and Dixon on 1763-67, eventually marked the Civil War division between the Union and Confederacy.

      As early as July 4, 1774, York Countians selected a committee to protest against British taxation and other oppressive measures. When Boston was blockaded as
a result of its famous tea party, York County provided financial help and military support. A local company of militia riflemen were among “associaters” or volunteer
militiamen within the county, and by 1778, a total of 4,621 York Countians answered the call to arms. In 1779 Colonel Thomas Hartley observed that, “the York
districts has armed first in Pennsylvania and has furnished more men for the war and lost a greater number of men in it than any other district on the continent of the
same number of individuals.”

The American Revolution

      Innumerable organized protest against parliamentary restrictions and sporadic fighting throughout the colonies swelled into organized revolution. In July 1776,
the Declaration of Independence was read to cheering Yorkers who gathered before the two-story red brick courthouse on Centre Square. Fourteen months later the
Continental Congress, having put the Susquehannah between themselves and the British who occupied Philadelphia, assembled in the same courthouse in order to
administer a nation not quite fully born.

      The presence of the Congress in York, from September 30, 1777 to June 27, 1778, brought the first printing press to the County. The press was necessary in
order that military and legislative news could be sent throughout the colonies. It was also used to print about $10,000,000 worth of currency while in York; money
that was so inflated as to be almost worthless. Undoubtedly the most important business conducted here was the drafting of the Articles of Confederation, which in
1781 would be ratified by the required two-thirds of the colonies, establishing the “United States of America.” Victory and independence would finally come for the
new nation in 1783."
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 



Historical Context of York , Penna  1777 [of the town and its inhabitants]
From Edward W. Spangler. žThe Annals of the Families of Caspar, Henry, Baltzer and George SpenglerÓ  York, Pennsylvania: The York Daily Publishing Co., 1896:

žIn 1731 there were 15,000  members of the Reformed Church in Pennsylvania from the Palatinate. Up to 1776, when the importations ceased, 39,000 German emigrants had arrived and settled mainly in Lancaster, York, Berks and Northampton counties. As early as 1790, when the population of this State did not exceed 435,000 there were already 145,000 GermansÓ p 324

During the Revolution, York became an important post town on account of the meetings of Congress here, and lines of stages then ran from Lancaster and Reading to York.

žAs late as October 25, 1777, John Adams, with no prepossession in their favor, while in Yorktown...attested as follows: This town is a small one, not larger than Plymouth. There are in it two German churches, the one a Lutheran, the other Calvinistical. The Congregations are pretty numerous, and their attendance upon public worship is decent. It is remarkable that the Germans, wherever they are found, are careful to maintain the public worship, which is more than can be said of the other denominations of Christians this way. There is one church here, erected by the joint contributions of Episcopalians and Presbyterians, but the minister who is a missionary is confined for Toryism, so that they have had for a long time no public  worship......
 Said Robert Proud, the early historian of Pennsylvania in regards to the Germans of Pennsylvania:
 "They are more adapted than any other nationalities to agriculture and the improvement of the wilderness." This opinion was fully justified by events, for the wilderness was not only heroically invaded, but subdued and improved; the home of the Indians soon  became dotted with the dwellings of the immigrants, the rude log house was followed by the substantial stone dwelling, and this again by the stately mansion of brick, until the dense forest has been converted into beautiful gardens, towns and cities, and literally made to blossom like the rose of the Scriptures.
Let us hear what a jovial stranger thought and said of the Pennsylvania Germans who wrought this transformation:
"I have lately passed through the Dutchiest part of Pennsylvania, and have observed some new and instructive points I never thought of before. Apparently said Dutch are a sedate people. They are as religious as New Englanders were fifty years ago. They are as sharp as Yankees after money, more saving and more generous. They are more intelligent, independent and happy than they appear, and bashful before strangers, especially the ladies. These and other traits make them appear exclusive and clanuish, yet they are the most social and comical people in America. Among them (if one understands their glib dialect) one can  hear more words, jokes and hearty laughs in a minute than ever the modern Greek or neu hoch Deutsch. I now have learned that the Pennsylvanians, who are well acquainted in English, cling to their dialect in small rapid talk and the firing of a multiplicity of jokes. They laugh oftener than do the Yankees, their women can deliver four words to a Yaukee woman's one in English, and more when excited. Therefore, Pennsylvania Dutch is a phonetic dialect. I patent this idea, and say to those who make fun of it that they can find more comical, witty characters--real Yankees--in Pennsylvania than in New England."   p 322-323




 

[The Stage and travel] 1770s-1838  York and Penna in general
 
 



 

žStage coaches without springs ran from Philadelphia to New York, beginning in 1756. During the Revolution, York became an important post town on account of the meetings of Congress here, and lines of stages then ran from Lancaster and Reading to York. In 1784 Frederick Sheaffer began to run a stage line from Philadelphia to Lancaster, which a year or two later wasextended to York. William McClelland and Samuel Spengler, in 1797, started a 'Lancaster, Baltimore and York stage line.' The trip one way was made in two days, and was begun on Monday, at the house of William Ferree, in Lancaster; fare for way passengers 5 1/2 cents per mile.
In May, 1800, William Scott started a line from Lancaster through York, Hanover, Gettysburg to Hagerstown and Frederick, Md. The line from Baltimore to Harrisburg was a very important route from 1796 to 1838, when the Baltimore and Susquehanna Railroad was completed to York. There were several competing lines over this route. Two rival lines ran between York and Harrisburg after 1838. At one time, on account of the cutting of rates, one of the owners of the line conveyed passengers from York to Harrisburg for 50 cents, and furnished a dinner in the bargain. Nearly all stage lines exchanged horses every ten or twelve miles. The York and Harrisburg line changed a mile below Goldsboro. Stages of all lines did not forget to stop a short time at the wayside inn, 'to refresh the inner man.' The line from Carlisle through Hanover to Baltimore was an important route, and was opened in 1790, or thereabouts. The arrival of a stage coach at a town or tavern was heralded with great joy. The hardy driver of an influential line always 'felt his importance,' but he generally knew how to 'tip the decanter' as well as how to crack his whip to the trot of his noble steeds.Ó
[From Edward W. Spangler The Annals of the Families of Caspar, Henry, Baltzer and George Spengler York, Pennsylvania: The York Daily Publishing Co., 1896. , p 494]
 



 
 
 
 



Brief and Interesting Snippets on Life in the Colonies 1798 as compiled by Edward Spangler, 1896
 

žAMERICA ONE HUNDRED YEARS AGO. (Text published 1896)

Every gentleman wore a queue and powdered his hair.
Imprisonment for debt was a common practice.
There was not a public library in the United States.
Almost all the furniture was imported from England.
An old copper mine in Connecticut was used as a prison.
There was only one hat factory, and that made cocked hats.
A day laborer considered himself well paid with two shillings a day.
Crockery plates were objected to because they dulled the knives.
A man who jeered at the preacher or criticised the sermon was fined.
Virginia contained a fifth of the whole population of the country.
A gentleman bowing to a lady always scraped his foot on the ground.
Two stage coaches bore all the travel between New York and Boston.
The whipping post and pillory were still standing in Boston and New York.
Beef, pork, salt fish, potatoes, and hominy were the staple diet all the year round.
Buttons were scarce and expensive, and the trousers were fastened with pegs or laces.
There were no manufactures in this country, and every housewife raised her own flax and made her own linen.
The church collection was taken in a bag at the end of a pole, with a bell attached to rouse sleepy contributors.
Leather breeches, a checked shirt, a red flannel jacket, and a cocked hat formed the dress of an artisan.
When a man had enough tea he placed his spoon across his cup to indicate that he wanted no more.
A new arrival in a jail was set upon by his fellow prisoners and robbed of everything he had. ž

Edward W. Spangler The Annals of the Families of Caspar, Henry, Baltzer and George Spengler York, Pennsylvania: The York Daily Publishing Co., 1896 



 
 
 



1790: MAIL FROM PHILADELPHIA TO PITTSBURG IN NINE DAYS.

"Schedule of the arrival and departure of the mail, at the several offices, from Philadelphia to Pittsburg.

"The mail to leave Philadelphia for Pittsburg every other Thursday, 6 o'clock P. M.

To arrive at Lancaster, Saturday 6 o'clock P. M.
"     "   "  York-Town, Monday, 12 o'clock at noon.
"     "   "  Carlisle, Tuesday, 10 o'clock A. M.
"     "   "  Shippensburg, Tuesday, 7 o'clock P. M.
"     "   "  Chambersburg, Wednesday, 10 o'clock A. M.
"     "   "  Bedford, Thursday, 12 o'clock at noon.
"     "   "  Pittsburg, Saturday, 6 o'clock P. M.

"The mail is to leave Pittsburg for Philadelphia every other Monday, 7 o'clock A. M.

 To arrive at Bedford, Wednesday, 12 o'clock at noon.
"     "   "  Chambersburg, Thursday, 6 o'clock P. M.
"     "   "  Shippensburg, Friday, 10 o'clock A. M.
"     "   "  Carlisle, Friday 12 o'clock at noon.
"     "   "  York-Town, Saturday, 7 o'clock A. M.
"     "   "  Lancaster, Saturday, 6 o'clock P. M.
"     "   "  Philadelphia, Wednesday, 6 o'clock P. M.
 Any errors that may be found in the above schedule, are to be subject to alteration, by the agreement of the subscribers.

SAMUEL OSGOOD,  JOHABOD GRUMMAN.
 The above is a copy taken from the contract.
GENERAL POST-OFFICE, March 5, 1790."   CHARLES BUNELL."
[From Edward W. Spangler The Annals of the Families of Caspar, Henry, Baltzer and George Spengler York, Pennsylvania: The York Daily Publishing Co., 1896. , page p 495 ]



 
 



York County Township Formation    [Link to original site ]
Following found in link from Pennsylvania Genealogy  USGENWEB found within the Hart Family page [York County, Pennsylvania Genealogy  USGENWEB  ©1996-2002 FamilyHart  [FamilyHart@aol.com]  Link to original site given above.

žYork County, Pennsylvania Townships
Townships in CAPS are Original York County Townships. Excludes Adams County which was formed from western side of York Co in 1800.
Township Name Formation and Division
Carroll formed 1831 part from MONAGHAN and part from Franklin.
CHANCEFORD formed 1745 as part of Lancaster. L. Chanceford was created from it in 1805.
CODORUS formed 1747 as part of Lanacster. N. Codorus was created from it in 1838.
Conewago formed 1818 from DOVER
DOVER formed 1745 as part of Lancaster. Conewago was created from it in 1818
East Hopewell formed 1885 from Hopewell
East Manchester former 1887 from MANCHESTER
FAWN formed 1745 as part of Lancaster. Peach Bottom was created from it in 1815
Fairview formed 1803 from NEWBERRY
Franklin formed 1809 from MONAGHAN. p/o Carroll formed from it in 1831.
HEIDELBERG formed 1749 when York formed. Penn formed from it in 1880
HELLAM formed 1738 as part of Lancaster. Part of Spring Garden was created from it in 1821
Hopwell formed 1767 from SHREWSBURY. North and East Hopwell formed from it in 1885
Jackson formed 1853 from PARADISE
Lower Chanceford formed 1805 from CHANCEFORD
Lower Windsor formed 1838 from Windsor.
MANCHESTER formed 1740 as part of Lancaster. West Manchester formed from it in 1799
East Manchester formed from it in 1887
MANHEIM formed 1747 as part of Lancaster. West Manheim formed from it in 1858
MONAGHAN formed 1745 as part of Lancaster. Franklin formed from it in 1809
Carroll formed from p/o MONAGHAN and p/o Franklin in 1831
NEWBERRY formed 1747 as part of Lancaster. Fairview was created from it in 1803
North Codorus formed 1838 from CODORUS
North Hopwell formed 1885 from Hopewell.
PARADISE formed 1747 as part of Lancaster. Jackson formed from it in 1853
Peach Bottom formed 1815 from FAWN
Penn formed 1880 from HEIDELBERG
SHREWSBURY formed 1742 as part of Lancaster but named STRESBURG. Hopewell formed from it in 1767. Springfield formed from it in 1835
Springettsbury formed in 1891 from York part of Spring Garden.
Springfield formed 1835 from SHREWSBURY
Spring Garden formed 1821 from p/o HELLAM and p/o YORK. Springettsbury created in 1891 from the York part of Spring Garden.. Hellam part remains as Spring Garden..
WARRINGTON formed 1744 as part of Lancaster. Washington formed from it in 1802
Washington formed 1802 from WARRINGTON
West Manchester formed 1799 from MANCHESTER
West Manheim formed 1858 from MANHEIM
Windsor formed in 1738 from YORK. Lower Windsor created from it in 1838
YORK formed 1745 as part of Lancaster. Windsor was created from it in 1758. Part of Spring Garden was created from it in 1821 and that was later formed into Springettsbury in 1891"


Our Surnames Presence in York County:
York County, Pennsylvania Surnames :
All Surnames of York County are Swope ascendancy Allied

[See York County Title Page Within the Vines For York Regional History, Maps,  Links
and further information on our lines of this Penna County ]

Surnames:
Quickel , Eichelberger , Spangler , Ziegler , Hoke , Humrichausen [Humrickhouse] ,  Stair , Bentz , Swope , Schneider


Schneider, Catharine , Jacob Bender's [ See Adams County] wife, was born in York County [unknown if part relative to now Adams County as her ascendancy is not determined] and died in Menallen Twp, now Adams County in 1786.
QUICKEL, John Born in Lancaster County in 1762, he died 1831 in Manchaster twp, York county, Penna. He married
BRENNEMAN, Elizabeth Born in Lancaster County, and they married  there in 1783. Their first children were born in Lancaster....but as the family grows, the children are found born in York County.  They are buried at Quickel's church, York County, Penna

EICHELBERGER Johann Phillip Friederich  arrived on Ship Albany from Rotterdam via Cowes 1 sept 1729. He survived his wife to die in York County [19 Sep 1776]. His first wife Dörner arrived with him on Ship Albany.  She died Lancaster County [bet. 1729 and 1738]. Note that  York was formed from Lancaster in 1749.
His 2nd Wife, our direct,
Maria Magdalena BECKER  by tradition was born in Germany, though some researchers suggest she may have been born Pennsylvania.
Their land was about three miles east of Hanover on the York Road, and this went to their son. They then lived in Hanover Town itself, and he is buried at a now non existent old burying ground 1 mile north of Hanover. while she died in the town itself.
SPANGLER [Spengler] Hans Kasper [  Spengler] arrived on William and Sarah from Rotterdam to Phily in Sept 1727. He and his new wife Judith forged into the wilderness west of the Penna's Susquehanna and died in York County. Great grandDaughter Lydia SPANGLER was born Paradise [now Jackson twp] York county,and married Adam Swope in 1804. Adam is found in Gettysburg, Adams County by 1806, and he and his wife raised their family there.

ZIEGLER, Judith
the future wife of Hans Kasper [  Spengler] , she arrived in sept 1727 with her parents. Whether she met him in Germany or on the ship is unknown, but they married soon after arrival. She, with her husband forged into the wilderness in York County. See her husband's entry above.

KINDIGEN [probably the female form of Kindig]
Maria [Mary (Catharine)] Kindigen; on her tombstone it says MARIA STINIA SPENGLER
Present in the region of York County now pertaining to Adams by 1743/4 when she is said to have married her husband Jonas Spangler there. But she and her husband Jonas Spangler are both buried In Paradise(Now-1896-Jackson Twp) PA [Pigeon Hill Cemetery,Paradise Hill,PA] . Her father was Martin Kindigen or Kindig. He is Under Research.

HOKE, Andrew.  son of Johann Jacob HOKE of Lancaster County, hemarried Barbara EICHELBERGER and they had several children in Paradise Twn.,York Co.,PA before emmigrating later to Kentucky. Daughter Maria Clara HOKE married Henry SPANGLER in  Paradise (Now-1896-Jackson) Twp, York County PA where they both died. Andrew Hoke's probable sister, also named Maria Clara, married Johann Conrad SWOPE . Both Maria Clara Hoke married Spangler, and Maria Clara Hoke married SWOPE are our direct forebears leading down to Adams County, Penna, as children from both unions intermarried congealing our direct line.

HUMICKHAUSEN/ HUMRICKHOUSE, John
Arrived 1748 on SHip Judith to Penna. Initially residing in and around York county, Penna., John Humrickhouse  moved his family to Germantown, Pa., in 1771.[he is presented also in Philadelphia in these pages  as a result]  Two sons and one son in law fought in the Revolution. . Daughter Mary  married Peter Bentz in 1774 at Lancaster County, and they both died in Conewago Township, York Co., Penna [he 1823, she 1842]  . Mary and Peter Bentz'sGrandaughter Lydia Stair married Samuel SWOPE and  removed by marriage to Adams County.

STAIR, Henry Born3 Jan 1830,  presumably in Penna.  This ancestor is frustratingly hard to get hold of. He died too young to be head of household for any census, and no Stair family yields him as son due to the constraints of pre 1850 census data.  He is buried at Prospect Hill Cemetery, york, Penna. His name may be an Americanized form of the German STOEHR, or STARR, but conversely he may be of British Isle ancestry.

BENTZ,  Johannes
Arrived 1732 to Phila Resided Manchester Twp. , now West Manchester Township, York County, Penna. G G Grandaughter [and our direct] Mary Elizabeth Bentz married William Henry Stair in York , York County, Penna. Their daughter Anna Kate Stair married Samuel McCurdy Swope of Gettysburg Adams County Penna in 1876, and they raised their children in his hometown.

Johann Conrad Swope [grandson of  Yost Swope who resided Lancaster County [see above] emmigrated to the area surronding Hanover, York County Penna in the latter quarter of the 18th century, and baptismal records of his children can be found in Adams County Lutheran [Adams was later formed from York and in 1800] . Conrad's son Adam emmigrated to Gettysburg , now Adams County, Penna by 1806 . He was born in Hanover.

[See York County Title Page Within the Vines For York Regional History, Maps,  Links
and further information on our lines of this Penna County ]
 

To Surnames involved in  Bucks County
To Surnames Philadelphia and its environs
To Surnames present Montgomery County, Penna
To Surnames Present in Chester County [before it turned to Lancaster, then found there as a result]
To Surnames present in Lancaster County, Penna
o Surnames present in Adams County, Penna
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QUICKEL, John and his wife
BRENNEMAN, Elizabeth
Born in Lancaster County in 1762, he died 1831 in Manchaster twp, York county, Penna. His wife was Born in Lancaster County, and they marriedc  there in 1783. Their first children were born in Lancaster....but as the family grows, the children are found born in York County.  They are buried at Quickel's church, York County, Penna
 

EICHELBERGER Johann Phillip Friederich  and his wife,
Anna Barbara DOERNERS  or Dörner
arrived on Ship Albany from Rotterdam via Cowes 1 sept 1729. She died Lancaster County [bet. 1729 and 1738] he in York County [19 Sep 1776]

SPANGLER [Spengler] Hans Kasper [  Spengler] arrived on William and Sarah from Rotterdam to Phily in Sept 1727. He and his new wife Judith forged into the wilderness west of the Penna's Susquehanna and died in York County. Great grandDaughter Lydia SPANGLER was born Paradise [now Jackson twp] York county,and married Adam Swope in 1804. Adam is found in Gettysburg, Adams County by 1806, and he and his wife raised their family there. Adams was formed from York County in 1800.

ZIEGLER, Judith
the future wife of Hans Kasper [  Spengler] , she arrived in sept 1727 with her parents. Whether she met him in Germany or on the ship is unknown, but they married soon after arrival. She, with her husband forged into the wilderness in York County. See her husband's entry above.

KINDIGEN [probably the female form of Kindig]
Maria [Mary (Catharine)] Kindigen; on her tombstone it says MARIA STINIA SPENGLER
Present in the region of York County now pertaining to Adams by 1743/4 when she is said to have married her husband Jonas Spangler there. But she and her husband Jonas Spangler are both buried In Paradise(Now-1896-Jackson Twp) PA [Pigeon Hill Cemetery,Paradise Hill,PA] . Her father was Martin Kindigen or Kindig. He is Under Research.
 

HOKE, Andrew.   son of Johann Jacob HOKE of Lancaster County, hemarried Barbara EICHELBERGER and they had several children in Paradise Twn.,York Co.,PA before emmigrating later to Kentucky. Daughter Maria Clara HOKE married Henry SPANGLER in  Paradise (Now-1896-Jackson) Twp, York County PA where they both died. Andrew Hoke's probable sister, also named Maria Clara, married Johann Conrad SWOPE . Both Maria Clara Hoke married Spangler, and Maria Clara Hoke married SWOPE are our direct forebears leading down to Adams County, Penna, as children from both unions intermarried congealing our direct line.

HUMICKHAUSEN/ HUMRICKHOUSE, John
Arrived 1748 on SHip Judith to Penna. Initially residing in and around York county, Penna., John Humrickhouse  moved his family to Germantown, Pa., in 1771.[he is presented also in Philadelphia in these pages  as a result]  Two sons and one son in law fought in the Revolution. . Daughter Mary  married Peter Bentz in 1774 at Lancaster County, and they both died in Conewago Township, York Co., Penna [he 1823, she 1842]  . Mary and Peter Bentz'sGrandaughter Lydia Stair married Samuel SWOPE and  removed by marriage to Adams County.

STAIR, Henry Born3 Jan 1830,  presumably in Penna.  This ancestor is frustratingly hard to get hold of. He died too young to be head of household for any census, and no Stair family yields him as son due to the constraints of pre 1850 census data.  He is buried at Prospect Hill Cemetery, york, Penna. His name may be an Americanized form of the German STOEHR, or STARR, but conversely he may be of British Isle ancestry.

BENTZ,  Johannes
Arrived 1732 to Phila Resided Manchester Twp. , now West Manchester Township, York County, Penna. G G Grandaughter [and our direct] Mary Elizabeth Bentz married William Henry Stair in York , York County, Penna. Their daughter Anna Kate Stair married Samuel McCurdy Swope of Gettysburg Adams County Penna in 1876, and they raised their children in his hometown.

Johann Conrad Swope [grandson of  Yost Swope who resided Lancaster County [see above] emmigrated to the area surronding Hanover, York County Penna in the latter quarter of the 18th century, and baptismal records of his children can be found in Adams County Lutheran [Adams was later formed from York and in 1800] . Conrad's son Adam emmigrated to Gettysburg , now Adams County, Penna by 1806 . He was born in Hanover.

Footnotes:
1. Edward W. Spangler The Annals of the Families of Caspar, Henry, Baltzer and George Spengler York, Pennsylvania: The York Daily Publishing Co., 1896
2. Edward W. Spangler. The Annals of the Families of Caspar, Henry, Baltzer and George Spengler. York, Pennsylvania: The York Daily Publishing Co., 1896.p 322-323